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SCENAR for Pain Relief & Chronic Illness by Dr. med. Jörg Prinz

An article about RITMSCENAR applications for pain relief and chronic illness by Dr Jorg Prinz has been published in the May-August 2014 issue of the New Zealand Natural Medicine Journal.

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Drug-free pain relief in the palm of your hand

Chris Mortensen, the CEO of NS Health has been featured in the latest edition of About Pain News! Well done Chris!

Drug-free pain relief in the palm of your hand

19 Jun 2013

Drug-free pain relief in the palm of your hand News image

Many Australian chronic pain sufferers are now finding relief with a small high-tech device that fits in the palm of your hand.  

The RITM SCENAR device, first developed in Russia, is a portable, battery operated, drug-free solution to pain relief.  

According to Chris Mortensen, SCENAR therapist and CEO of NS Health, the device helps the body heal naturally – often avoiding medication or surgery.

To read the article please click on the link below:

about-pain

Angelo State CSS Researching SCENAR Device

April 09, 2013

In 2013, a joint research project conducted by Angelo State University’s Center for Security Studies (CSS) and Boston University’s Emergency Healthcare Management program, which could help lead to future health benefits for emergency services responders throughout the U.S.

The project, which got under way April 1, involves testing of the Russian-made Self Controlled Energo Neuro Adaptive Regulator, or SCENAR, which is a hand-held electrotherapeutic device FDA approved for non-invasive and non-narcotic treatment of chronic and acute pain, similar to a TENS unit…Read more

Angelo State CSS Researching SCENAR Device

Angelo State CSS Researching SCENAR Device

In 2013, a joint research project conducted by Angelo State University’s Center for Security Studies (CSS) and Boston University’s Emergency Healthcare Management program, which could help lead to future health benefits for emergency services responders throughout the U.S.

The project, which got under way April 1, involves testing of the Russian-made Self Controlled Energo Neuro Adaptive Regulator, or SCENAR, which is a hand-held electrotherapeutic device FDA approved for non-invasive and non-narcotic treatment of chronic and acute pain, similar to a TENS unit…Read more

Florida Doctor develops cutting edge Alternative Therapy Program to help Veterans in Chronic Pain

Dr Corbin takes a western approach to using various modalities such as Auricular Medicine, Acupuncture & RITM SCENAR® to treat Chronic Pain Diagnosed Veterans.

(PRWEB) April 03, 2012

In 1998 the West Palm Veterans Administration Hospital decided to enlist the aid of the University of Miami Complementary Alternative Medicine Dept. in using Alternative Therapies in the Physical Medicine Rehabilitation Department. An initial study using acupuncture similar to an Auricular Acupuncture Study being done in the university was initiated in Chronic Pain Department with patients.

"I believe the RITM SCENAR allows me to identify exactly how to best formulate a treatment plan for patients" says Dr Corbin.

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Dr. Lipscomb, USA talks about her experience with the powerful RITM SCENAR technology

Dr. Lipscomb, USA talks about her experience with the powerful RITM SCENAR technology. To read the article please click on the link below:

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BACK PAIN AND SCENAR – PREHOSPITAL PAIN RELIEF. MULTICENTER COMPARATIVE STUDY.

BACK PAIN AND SCENAR – PREHOSPITAL PAIN RELIEF.
MULTICENTER COMPARATIVE STUDY.

A.V. Tarakanov, A.A. Tarakanov. A. A. Yakushev, I.D. Hatisova
Rostov State Medical University, Rostov-on-Don,
State Healthcare Institution ‘City hospital ? 21’, Saint-Petersburg,
Emergency stations: Bataysk, Maykop, Rostov-on-Don, Pyatigorsk, Essentuki

30-52 % of all emergency calls come from patients that suffer from pain. In most cases that pain is caused by diseases of joints and back. The problem of back pains is really current as it:
1) affects many people of all ages;
2) has objective difficulties in differential diagnostics;
3) results in great economic loss for the society;
4) involves development of non-drug therapies to relieve pain that could be administered by medical specialists, as well as by patients.

We suggested to use SCENAR device (Self Controlled Electro Neuro Adaptive Regulator) as an alternative or complementary pain relief therapy. The device generates high-voltage bipolar pulse current without dc component on the principle of the biotechnical feedback.

Trial objective – introduce and perform a comparative study on how SCENAR monotherapy can help prehospital patients suffering pains in cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine regions in acute and subacute conditions, as well as in exacerbations of the chronic back pain.

Materials and methods. We used the CHANS-SCENAR-02 device manufactured by RITM OKB ZAO and spaced plate electrodes (16 cm2) . 415 patients participated in the study (95 men and 320 women), age 30-80 years, 240 of them received SCENAR therapy.
We matched patients by age and gender, duration of the disease, and how long the emergen-cy team was at the patient on call. Commonly pains were severe and of acute nature, so the patients called the emergency. The radiation of pain was various.

Evaluation methods – visual analogue scale. The trial was randomized and unmasked. Ex-clusion criteria for SCENAR therapy were contraindications in the User’s Manual, i.e. individual intolerance (hypersensitization), heart pacemaker, severe mental diseases, acute infectious diseases of unknown origin, and fibrillation criterion added in the study. Patients gave verbal consent for the therapy. Exclusion criteria for the drugs were contraindications in the instructions for use.
To select patients, evaluate their state and assess dynamics after the treatment we used spe-cific protocols.

Cervical pain.
Group 1 – SCENAR (spaced electrodes, n=28); placing and moving the electrodes on the skin according to the pattern for 10-15 minutes, cervical zone, modulation 3:1, stimulation energy individual, frequency 90 Hz.
Group 2 – SCENAR (built-in device electrode, n=62); subjectively dosed mode, cervical zone and painful zone, 15-20 minutes, stimulation energy individual, frequency 90 Hz.
Group 3 (control) – baralgin – 5 ml (metamizole sodium – 2,5 g) i.m., (n=22).
Group 4 (control) – ketorolac tromethamine 2 ml (30 mg) i.m., (n=23).
Group 5 (control) – ketoprofen 2 ml (100 mg) i.m., (n=31).

Thoracic pain.
Group 1 – SCENAR (built-in device electrode, n=49); subjectively dosed mode, thoracic zone and pain projection, 15-20 minutes, stimulation energy individual, frequency 90 Hz.
Group 2 (control) – ketoprofen 2 ml (100 mg) i.m., (n=52).

Lumbar pain.
Group 1 – SCENAR (spaced electrodes, n=31); placing and moving the electrodes on the skin according to the pattern for 10-15 minutes, lumbar zone, modulation 3:1, stimulation energy individual, frequency 90 Hz.
Group 2 – SCENAR (built-in device electrode, n=70); subjectively dosed mode, lumbar zone and pain projection, 15-20 minutes, stimulation energy individual, frequency 90 Hz.
Group 3 (control) – baralgin – 5 ml (metamizole sodium – 2,5 g) i.m., (n=24).
Group 4 (control) – ketorolac tromethamine 2 ml (30 mg) i.m., (n=25).
Group 5 (control) – ketoprofen 2 ml (100 mg) i.m., (n=54).
Statistical processing of the results was performed by the independent researcher using the Student’s t-criterion and Mann-Whitney criterion.

Results.
The report provides only treatment results of subjective pain assessment. Fig. 1 shows data on cervical pain management. For better comparison they are calculated in percent in relation to the parameters before the treatment. Using the visual analogue scale patients scored their state before treatment from 4 to 7 points.

Fig.1. Pain relief dynamics in visual analogue scale (% of the initial level) of prehospital pa-tients suffering pains in cervical spine region, * – ?<0,05.

Figure 1? shows that most effective SCENAR was with spaced electrodes, 20-30% greater then stimulation with the built-in electrode, and by 30th minute after the treatment session was 75,7% of the initial level. We suppose the effect is achieved due to greater area of the electrodes and two-side stimulation in the modulation mode of the spastic cervical muscles.

Figure 1b shows that the pain relief effect of SCENAR with the built-in electrode by 30th minute after the treatment session was similar to the effect of three analgetics – metamizole sodium, ketorolac, and ketoprofen – in standard dosage. Among all three drugs, ketoprofen was most effec-tive (63.6%). Still SCENAR stimulation with spaced electrodes was more effective than drugs.

Figure 2 shows results of treating thoracic spine region. This region of the spine is the most problematic in the differential diagnostics. The patient may have the disease of the spinal column or internals, ischemic heart disease, and all that may cause reflective pain in that region of the spine. We made ECG to all the patients suffering pain in the thoracic region. The aim of the emergency doctor in such a case is to relieve pain, in an appropriate and safe manner, and do not overlook any other serious disease.

Fig.2. Pain relief dynamics in visual analogue scale (% of the initial level) of prehospital pa-tients suffering pains in thoracic spine region, * – ?<0,05.

Figure 2 shows that the pain relief effect of SCENAR already in 10 minutes after the treat-ment session was greater than that of the ketoprofen by 39.5%, and by 12% at 30th minute after the session. The data are statistically valid.

Figure 3 shows treatment results for lumbar region. The upper figure (a) displays the com-parison of SCENAR effect with spaced and built-in electrodes. The effect of spaced-electrode-stimulation was significantly higher only by 20th minute after the treatment, 53,6% vs. 41,1%. In general, such treatment techniques tended to be more effective.

The effect of inbuilt-electrode-stimulation was completely similar to that of the drug thera-pies (Fig. 3b).

Fig.3. Pain relief dynamics in visual analogue scale (% of the initial level) of prehospital pa-tients suffering pains in lumbar spine region, * – ?<0,05.

The results of our study show that SCENAR monotherapy for patients that had to call the emergency suffering pains in cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine regions is an appropriate real-time pain relief therapy. SCENAR non-drug therapy could be an alternative for patients that have contra-indications for analgetics (allergic reactions, possible side effects, hard-to-get medications, etc.). No side effects or patiets’ refusal from SCENAR observed. SCENAR-therapy contributed to normali-zation of blood pressure, pulse, and breathing rate in most patients. This therapy is easy-to-use, fast-acting for pain relieving, has almost no absolute contraindications, including cancer diseases al-ready diagnosed and only suspected. All that makes this type of pain relief therapy a very prospec-tive for emergency and first aid.

Findings.
1. For patients suffering pains in the cervical spine region most effective therapy is SCE-NAR stimulation with spaced electrodes. Pain relief effect of SCENAR with built-in electrode is similar to the effect analgetics – metamizole sodium, ketorolac, and ketoprofen – in common dos-age.
2. For patients suffering pains in the thoracic spine region SCENAR with built-in electrode is more effective than ketoprofen.
3. For patients suffering pains in the lumbar spine region spaced-electrode-stimulation tend-ed to be more effective. The effect of both techniques of SCENAR stimulation is similar to the ef-fect from analgetics (metamizole sodium, ketorolac, and ketoprofen in common dosage).
4. SCENAR is an appropriate and safe pain relief therapy for patients suffering back pain.

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EFFECT OF SCENAR-THERAPY ON VASCULATURE FUNCTIONALITY

EFFECT OF SCENAR-THERAPY ON VASCULATURE FUNCTIONALITY

A.Cherchago, A. Molchanov, A. Tarakanov, L. Klimova.
Russia, Taganrog, Rostov-on-Don

Modern research studies show that SCENAR-therapy, no matter in what pathology, has certain effect on metabolism. This effect provides restoration of balance in ‘prooxidants-antioxidants’ system, i.e. management of oxidative stress.

Management of oxidative stress after SCENAR-therapy is already proved in patients with:
• acute renal failure with hypertension caused by compression injury;
• Q-wave AMI;
• early postinfarction angina;
• relapse of duodenal ulcer;
• chronic insomnia;
• tubo-peretoneal infertility and others.

Such an effect without antioxidative drug therapy is possible only when SCENAR has direct and indirect influence on delivering main metabolite for the cells – oxygen. As peripheral blood circulatory system is the final link of most quick and accurate regulation of oxygen supply, we supposed that the effect of SCENAR is manifested as the influence on the vasculature functionality.

To prove our hypothesis we used one of the methods for analyzing peripheral blood circulation – Finger Photoplethysmography (PPG) and developed original method for analyzing PPG-signal.

PPG curve shows blood volume pulse in finger microvessels, its maximum corresponds to greatest increase in blood volume in the investigated vasculature.
It is known that relative decrease in PPG amplitude reflects the decrease in the blood volume pulse and can sign peripheral vasoconstriction (narrowing of the blood vessels), while relative increase in amplitude signs directly opposite – increase in the blood volume pulse and vasolidation (widening of blood vessels). Therefore, following the amplitude dynamics of pulse wave, we can control changes in the blood flow associated with vessel reaction to some factors. PPG can be also used to determine time characteristics of pulse wave, in particular, duration of cardiac cycle. (Fig.1).

Fig 1. Finger Photoplethysmography (Amp – pulse wave amplitude, RR corresponds to cardiac cycle duration)

For each heart beat we can determine volumetric bloodflow rate of microvessels as relation of pulse wave amplitude (Amp) to cardiac cycle duration (RR), and draw dependence of changes on time (rhythmoinotropic curve). Fig. 2 shows the illustration of such dependence, resulted from PPG recorded at rest in a lying position (the record lasted 1200 sec). Fig. 3 shows the same dependence, but with SCENAR stimulation (arrows show start and finish of stimulation).

Fig.3 Rhythmoinotropic curve with SCENAR stimulation.

Comparing curve 1 and 2 we can see significant differences – regular, high-amplitude variations of blood velocity with a period from 30 to 50 sec that are not registered at rest. Laser Doppler flowmetry data show that such velocity variations in peripheral bloodflow with a period from 20 to 50 sec are associated with neurogenic regulation of peripheral vessel tone. They occur as a result of periodical increase-decrease of vasoconstriction effects on other elements of peripheral vasculature, except for capillary vessels.

Using the proposed method for evaluating dynamics of blood volume pulse following the PPG readings we decided to find out empirically does SCENAR produce any effect on this parameter of oxygen supply regulation in physiological norm, and if yes, what existing mechanisms help SCENAR to effect metabolism.

Pilot study war carried out in RITM OKB. Almost healthy volunteers participated in the research. SCENAR stimulation was performed at basic frequencies – 60 or 90 Hz with comfortable stimulation level. Treatment session was no longer than 15 mins and the patient was in a lying position. PPG war recorded from an index finger, out of the stimulation area. The record started 5 mins before stimulation, continued during the treatment session and finished 5 mins after the session. The volunteer was in a lying position 25-30 mins maximum.

For each volunteer we made 10-13 records at rest and 30-45 records with different irritation factors (stimulation of zones prescribed after RISTA-EPD diagnostics, 6 facial points, 3 pathways, cervical zone, median paravertebral line, inside of a knee joint using multiple electrode, stimulation using any device produced by other manufacturer and positioned as SCENAR, in hyperventilation and breathing air enriched with ??2, as well as TENS stimulation of 6 facial points using dry coaxial electrode at a frequency of 2,5 Hz).

What we found out:

1. SCENAR-stimulation provides the increase of variation period for volumetric peripheral bloodflow in the range from 19.5 to 50 sec. Data of laser Doppler flowmetry show that these variations correspond to neurogenic range and reflect the contribution of nervous system to regulation of vasculature functionality.

2. After SCENAR average rate of volumetric bloodflow in the peripheral vasculature decreases, and amplitude of its rate variations increases, if compared with the initial values (Fig. 4). At rest these changes are not observed (Fig.5).

Fig. 4. Initial and final values of average flow rate and variation amplitude before and after SCENAR

Fig.5. Initial and final values of average flow rate and variation amplitude at first and last 5 minutes of recording at rest

3. Intensity of bloodflow rate changes in SCENAR-stimulation increases, if compared to initial values. Decrease in the rate is more intensive (Fig.6). At rest variation intensity decreases or doesn’t change much (Fig.7).

Fig. 6. Initial and final intensity values of increase/decrease in flow rate after SCENAR

Fig.7. Initial and final intensity values of increase/decrease in flow rate at rest.

4. SCENAR provides new mechanism of peripheral bloodflow regulation. This mechanism has lower flow rate and/or longer cardiac cycle (Fig. 9). At rest and under the influence of other irritations mechanism of peripheral bloodflow doesn’t change.

Fig.8 Pulse values of cardiac cycle duration and bloodflow rate during first 300 sec before stimulation (left picture) and 300 sec after SCENAR (different colors show series of 100 sec episodes).

5. Most stabile changes were observed when performing stimulation under the RISTA-EPD prescription. The effect was enhanced when stimulation was synchronized with certain phases of neurogenic variations (Fig. 10).

Fig.9. Momentary values of cardiac cycle duration and bloodflow rate during first 300 sec before stimulation (left picture) and 300 sec after SCENAR (? axis – RR duration in msec, Y axis – bloodflow rate in c.u./sec, different colors show series of 100 sec episodes).

5. Similar result that remains in the aftereffect, though not so regularly, was observed after stimulation of:

Cervical zone (Fig.10)

Fig. 10.
3 pathways (Fig.11)

Fig. 11.
Median paravertebral line (1 pathway) (Fig.12)

Fig. 12.
6 facial points (Fig. 13)

6. The effect was after stimulation using multiple electrode connected to SCENAR-NT via graphic commutator (Fig.14).

Fig.14.
7. Stimulation at rest (Fig.15), stimulation using one of the devices produced by other manufacturer and positioned as SCENAR (Fig.16), TENS stimulation with dry coaxial electrode (Fig.17) gave no such effect.

Fig.15.

Fig.16.

Fig. 17.

8. We managed to get similar reactions using methods that have a proven effect on vasculature functionality – in hyperventilation (Fig.18) and breathing in air enriched with ??2 (Fig. 19). However, the effect didn’t remain.

Fig. 18.

Fig.19.

The data obtained let us suppose that SCENAR effect on vasculature functionality provides decrease of vasoconstriction effects and decrease of average volumetric peripheral bloodflow, associated with increase of variation amplitude around the average value within the neurogenic range. Fig.21 shows typical dynamics of volumetric peripheral bloodflow in SCENAR-therapy. Yellow line is the rate averaged by 100 values with a ‘sliding window’. Blue line is pulse rate. Vertical lines mark start and finish of SCENAR-stimulation.

Fig. 21. Typical dynamics of volumetric peripheral bloodflow in SCENAR-therapy (yellow line is the average rate dynamics, calculated for each moment by 100 values with a ‘sliding window’, blue line is pulse rate in each moment ).
For comparison, Fig. 22 shows typical dynamics of peripheral bloodflow at rest.

Fig.22. Typical dynamics of peripheral bloodflow at rest.

We suppose the decrease of average volumetric rate till certain value and increase in its variation amplitude can provide the decrease of oxygen supply in negative phase up to the value, when hypoxia episodes may develop, and hypoxia has the effect of periodical hypoxic training. Based on this effect management of oxidative stress and increase of antioxidant defense in various diseases are proved for aerobic exercises, intermittent atmospheric hypoxic therapy, special breathing techniques, dry carbon dioxide baths and some other methods. However, effectiveness of these methods greatly depends on dosage – not enough duration has no training effect. Basic feature of SCENAR-therapy, if compared to the described methods, is that the dosage is selected from the inside, by the body itself, rather than from outside. The load is accurately dosed due to limiting action of local metabolic regulatory mechanisms. It is known that when the content of metabolic products in hypoxic period reaches certain level, their activity may block nerve vasoconstriction effects and compensate hypoxia aftereffects. At this, the body itself doses the hypoxic load according to its functional reserve of the weakest link and next cycle of hypoxic load (decrease of bloodflow rate), despite the continuous effect of SCENAR, starts only after consequences of previous hypoxic episode are compensated (supercompensated?). In this connection, SCENAR-practice shows that regardless the ‘wish’ of a doctor, our body ‘selects’ that weak link that needs to be restored first of all at a certain level of hypoxic load. Only after that SCENAR stimulation may provide the continued decrease of average bloodflow rate. As nerve tissue is most reactive to hypoxia, SCENAR-effect, as a rule, starts with the improvement of this function – more economic regulation of bloodflow (lower rate and longer RR). For this reason, practicing doctors say that no matter what kind of disease you are treating, positive dynamics in patients’ state always starts with improvement in neurological state.

In conclusion we would like to pay your attention that presented data were obtained in physiological norm and the scope of our experimental investigation is limited. Therefore, in this report we provided only qualitative assessment and can’t state for sure that our hypothesis is right and correct. We decided to make this report being on this stage of the research because yet we have no results or data that contradicted to our hypothesis, were in conflict with any proven facts or went against the observations of practicing doctors.

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Some Intriguing Case Studies In Pain Relief and Health Recovery With SCENAR Applications – Part 1

Some Intriguing Case Studies In Pain Relief and Health Recovery With SCENAR Applications – Part 1

Dr. Jorg Prinz, Wilfried Wand
Natural Medicine #6, 2012

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SCENAR-therapy in Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation

B.P.Kulizhskiy S.S.Kulizhskaya A.I.Maar O.V.Minayev 

SCENAR-therapy in Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation

Stroke is one of the main disabling diseases. According to statistical data of the Ministry of Health Care and Social Development of the Russian Federation and World Health Organization (WHO), the stroke incidence has risen greatly in recent years. However, after discharge from the hospital, patients rarely undergo rehabilitation, and if so, the measures are usually incomplete. The time of in-patient treatment has been reduced. After 21 day of in-hospital treatment, patients are discharged to be followed up by a district (regional) neurologist. However, regional outpatient clinics are often unable to provide adequate care to such patients due to lack of time, staff (rehabilitation and speech therapists, psychologists, masseurs etc.) and facilities.

This research is current as we suggest a new multiple approach to post-stroke rehabilitation, with SCENAR as a basic therapy.

SCENAR-therapy provides the following well-known effects:

Restoration of nervous connections and compensation of lost nervous connections (somatic component):

  • ANS regulation
  • Superficial sensation
  • Deep sensation
  • Body scheme
  • Gross motor skills
  • Fine motor skills

Recovery of cognitive functions:

  • Gnosis
  • Praxis
  • Speech

Recovery of higher mental and behavioral functions

  • Emotional component
  • Behavioral component

Research objective – carrying out a clinical trial on using SCENAR-therapy as a basic therapy in post-stroke rehabilitation.

Tasks:

  • Determine and evaluate practical effectiveness of SCENAR-therapy in rehabilitation.
  • Develop most effective methods of SCENAR use.
  • Work out guidelines on using SCENAR in post-stroke rehabilitation.

The patient population included post-stroke patients who had the disease for 3 months to 1 year and had no special rehabilitation care before.

All the patients had the diagnosis confirmed by neuroimaging and received in-patient care in a neurological hospital during the exacerbation.

43 people – 37 male and 6 female – have been examined and treated from 01.11.08 till 01.07.09.

The patient age ranged from 45 to 75 years, mean age – 58.

To make a control group, we have examined 18 more people (male), who undergo conventional drug rehabilitation ‘under the care of a district neurologist and therapist’ and who have had ischemic stroke at the same time as those who received SCENAR-therapy. The age of people included in the control group corresponds to the target age of the therapeutic groups.

Treatment Design

Combination of SCENAR-therapy and corrective mechanical therapy in order to restore deep proprioceptive sensation and coordination of movements.

The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on the therapeutic strategies applied:

  • Treatment of central zones only (‘Collar zone’, ‘3 pathways and 6 points’), head (comb electrode).
  • Treatment of distal parts of the limbs and the head (comb electrode).

All patients received 12 sessions daily from a SCENAR-therapist, and then the treatment was continued at home with  CHANS-SCENAR for 2 weeks (the sessions were given by family members using the guidelines provided by the doctor).

In addition to SCENAR-therapy, all patients received conventional drug therapy considering the severity of condition and coexistent pathology.

Control methods

In view of heterogeneity and small size of the total population, we used short statistical processing. Initially, therapeutic groups included the same number of patients but because of heterogeneous gender patterns and one out-of-order case, we have selected 18 patients in each group to be compared. So, we had 3 groups (18 people each): Central Techniques (Group 1), Peripheral Techniques (Group 2), and the Control (Group 3).

The patients were checked up twice – prior to the treatment and right after the treatment, that is  1 month after the initial check-up.

The following methods have been selected for control:

  • Standard clinical and neurological examination with a detailed analysis of complaints and clinical presentations.
  • Quality-of-life assessment on a 10-point visual analogue scale.
  • 10 Words Test to evaluate short-term memory.
  • Schultz tables for attention assessment.

Overall Findings 

As a result, among all the patients treated, the condition has improved in 37 patients, 5 patients had no significant changes, and in 1 patient – aggravation (patient aged 75, thrombosis in the region of posterior cerebral artery caused by chronic heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes mellitus, and multiple organ pathology).

Neurologic examination revealed an improvement in all patients of therapeutic groups, especially when compared with the control group. 2 patients recovered from motor alalia with lingual embol (which lasted for 7 and 11 months), both cases – from Group 2. Within groups 1 and 2, despite obvious improvement, no significant difference in neurological picture was found.

In the psychological test, significant difference was found between Group 1 (central techniques) and Group 2 (peripheral techniques); and a significant difference of the clinical picture as compared with the control Group 3. The psychological data are summarized in the Chart and represented on Diagrams 1, 2, and 3 that follow.

Central techniques

(n = 18)

Peripheral techniques

(n = 18)

Control

(n = 18)

before after before after before after
10 words primary 4.1 (±0.15) 7.3 (±0.15) 4.2 (±0.15) 7.8 (±0.15) 4.4 (±0.15) 4.5 (±0.15)
secondary 3.5 (±0.15) 6.3 (±0.15) 3.3 (±0.15) 7.0 (±0.15) 3.7 (±0.15) 3.6 (±0.15)
Shultz tables 242 (±2) 185 (±2) 253 (±2) 174 (±2) 233 (±2) 238 (±2)
Quality of life 4.4 (±0,2) 8.3 (±0.2) 4.7 (±0.2) 8.1 (±0.2) 4.5 (±0.2) 4.8 (±0.2)

Table 1 (Psychological data)

Diagram 1  10 Words Test

Diagram 2  Shultz Tables Test

Diagram 3  Quality-of-Life Test

Discussion

In therapeutic groups we achieved a significant neurological improvement that was also proven by neuroimaging. From objective neurological data, we cannot judge yet which is more advantageous – Central or Peripheral Techniques. To do so, we need additional instrumental research is needed and a more homogeneous population whose data can be validated. However, we can state with confidence that month-long rehabilitation that includes SCENAR-therapy is definitely far more effective than drug monotherapy.

From psychological test data, Peripheral Techniques provide a more pronounced recovery of higher mental and cognitive functions, when used in rehabilitation after ischemic stroke. Nevertheless, Central Techniques also provide a significant effect as compared with that in the control group. To determine more clearly the tropism of the techniques to the patient’s condition, a more extensive research is required.

Such rehabilitation also improves the patients’ quality of life, and decreases the level of depression and autoaggression. This allows recommending SCENAR-therapy for treating psychosomatic and psychological disorders accompanied by depression.

SCENAR-therapy in multiple rehabilitation after ischemic stroke would allow to get highly optimistic results. Its therapeutic techniques are easy to learn and use. They can be safely advised to be used by nurses and paramedical personnel – psychologists, rehabilitation and speech therapists etc. Moreover, the treatment does not end in a therapist’s office. Patients themselves can continue treatment with rather affordable, accessible and easy-to-use CHANS-SCENAR devices after appropriate training.

Conclusions

  1. SCENAR-therapy can be used as a basic therapy for rehabilitation of post-stroke patients.
  2. SCENAR-therapy can be used not only by medical professionals but psychologists, rehabilitation and speech therapists as well (since it improves the quality of psychosomatic therapy, restores speech and cognitive functions and promotes faster recovery).
  3. Additional research and investigations are required, and treatment techniques should be improved.
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